Terms

Resource Terms Explained

ACA Marketplace:

A service that helps people shop for and enroll in affordable health insurance. The federal government operates the Marketplace, available at HealthCare.gov, for most states. Some states run their own Marketplaces.

Case Management:

Case management is the coordination of services on behalf of an individual person who may be considered a case in different settings such as health care, nursing, rehabilitation, social work, disability insurance, employment, and law.

Child Care Assistance/CCAP:

Child Care Assistance Program provides low-income, working families with access to affordable, quality child care that allows them to continue working and contributes to the healthy, emotional and social development of the child.

CHIP/SCHIP:

The Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP/formerly known as SCHIP) is a partnership between the federal and state governments that provides low-cost health coverage to children in families that earn too much money to qualify for Medicaid.

Energy Assistance/LIHEAP, LEAP, etc:

A federal program that helps low income households pay for heating or cooling their homes. In most states, it also helps people make sure their homes are more energy efficient by paying for certain home improvements, known as weatherization.

Federally Qualified Health Care Center:

FQHCs are outpatient clinics that qualify for specific reimbursement systems under Medicare and Medicaid.

FITAP:

The Family Independence Temporary Assistance Program (FITAP) provides cash assistance to families with children when the financial resources of the family are insufficient to meet subsistence needs. The goal of FITAP is to decrease the long-term dependency on welfare assistance by promoting job preparation and work.

Housing Authority:

A housing authority or ministry of housing is generally a governmental body that governs some aspect of the territory’s housing, often providing low rent or free apartments to qualified residents

HUD:

Supports community development and home ownership. HUD does this by improving affordable home ownership opportunities, increasing safe and affordable rental options, reducing chronic homelessness, fighting housing discrimination by ensuring equal opportunity in the rental and purchase markets, and supporting vulnerable populations

Job Corps:

Job Corps is a program administered by the United States Department of Labor that offers free-of-charge education and vocational training to young men and women ages 16 to 24.

Lifeline Program:

The Lifeline Program has provided a discount on phone service for qualifying low-income consumers to ensure that all Americans have the opportunities and security that phone service brings, including being able to connect to jobs, family and emergency services. Lifeline is part of the Universal Service Fund. The Lifeline program is available to eligible low-income consumers in every state, territory, commonwealth, and on Tribal lands.

Medicaid:

Medicaid is a jointly funded, Federal-State health insurance program for low-income and needy people. It covers children, the aged, blind, and/or disabled and other people who are eligible to receive federally assisted income maintenance payments

Plan First

Family Planning services are designed to help Medicaid eligible men and women prevent or delay pregnancy. Females of childbearing age, 8 through 55, and males of any age who may be sexually active and meet the criteria for Medicaid eligibility may receive family planning services.

Section 8:

The Section 8 Housing Choice Voucher (HCV) program is the most well known and sought after housing program in America. There are more than 2,400 Public Housing Agencies (PHAs, or commonly referred to as housing authorities) that manage the Section 8 HCV program for a specific jurisdiction, such as a city, county, or region of multiple areas. PHAs are funded and overseen by the U. S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD).

SNAP:

SNAP (The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program) is the country’s most important federal nutrition program. It helps eligible low-income households to purchase food. People must meet certain income and resource requirements to be eligible for SNAP, and they can apply at their state office.

TAFI:

The TAFI Program provides temporary cash assistance and work preparation services for families with kids. The program provides cash benefits for eligible low-income families and households to help pay for food, clothing, shelter, and other essentials.

TANF:

TANF stands for Temporary Assistance for Needy Families. The TANF program, which is time limited, assists families with children when the parents or other responsible relatives cannot provide for the family’s basic needs. The Federal government provides grants to States to run the TANF program.

TEA/Cash Assistance:

The TEA Program is a time-limited assistance program to help needy families with children become more responsible for their own support and less dependent on public assistance. … The TEA program is federally funded and provides time-limited cash assistance to needy families with (or expecting) children.

TEFAP:

The Emergency Food Assistance Program (TEFAP) is a Federal program that helps supplement the diets of low-income Americans, including elderly people, by providing them with emergency food assistance at no cost.

The National School Lunch Program:

The National School Lunch Program is a federally assisted meal program operating in public and nonprofit private schools and residential child care institutions. It provides nutritionally balanced, low-cost or free lunches to children each school day.

Unemployment Insurance:

Unemployment Insurance is temporary income for eligible workers who lose their jobs through no fault of their own.

WIC:

The Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children – known as WIC – provides low-income pregnant women, new mothers, infants, and children with nutritious foods, nutrition education, and improved access to health care in order to prevent nutrition-related health problems in pregnancy, infancy, and early childhood.